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Dacogen And Vidaza May Improve Survival Of MDS Patients With Monosomy 7 (EHA 2012)

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Published: Jul 10, 2012 11:40 am
Dacogen And Vidaza May Improve Survival Of MDS Patients With Monosomy 7 (EHA 2012)

Results of a German study indicate that Dacogen and Vidaza may improve the survival of myelodysplastic syndromes patients with the chromosomal abnormality monosomy 7.

Specifically, the researchers found that myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) patients with monosomy 7 who received treatment with Dacogen (decitabine) or Vidaza (azacitidine) had longer progression-free and overall survival times than patients who received any other forms of treatment.

These findings were presented last month at the 17th Congress of the European Hematology Association (EHA) in Amsterdam.

Cells contain DNA that is tightly wound into chromosomes.  Most human cells have 23 pairs of chromosomes.  However, sometimes chromosomal abnormalities occur, resulting in chromosomes with missing or duplicated DNA segments.

People with the chromosomal abnormality monosomy 7 have only one copy of chromosome 7, rather than a pair.

According to the German researchers, about 2 percent of MDS patients have monosomy 7.

Previous research has shown that there are differences in prognoses between MDS patients with a partial deletion in chromosome 7 and patients missing an entire chromosome 7 (please see related Beacon news).

In the current study, the authors sought to further analyze the significance of monosomy 7 in MDS.

The researchers retrospectively analyzed data from 172 MDS patients with monosomy 7 from four treatment centers inGermany.

Of the 172 patients included in the analysis, 15 percent had intermediate-1 risk MDS, 42 percent had intermediate-2 risk MDS, and 43 percent had high-risk MDS.

Approximately two-thirds of patients (62 percent) were treated with best supportive care.  The rest of the patients had received up to three different types of sequential therapy, including chemotherapy, drugs such as Vidaza and Dacogen, and stem cell transplantation.

According to the investigators, the share of patients with advanced disease was higher among patients with monosomy 7 (43 percent), compared to the overall MDS patient population (13 percent) from a previous international study of MDS patients. 

In addition, patients with monosomy 7 had lower median white blood cell counts (1.3 x 103/mL versus 2.1 x 103/mL) and lower median platelet counts (75 x 103/mL versus 124 x 103/mL) than the overall MDS population.

However, there were no differences in red blood cell levels between MDS patients with monosomy 7 and MDS patients overall.

The researchers found that untreated patients with a partial deletion in chromosome 7 survived longer (34 months) than patients with monosomy 7 (12.5 months).

The median time to progression to acute myeloid leukemia was also longer for patients with a partial deletion in chromosome 7 (not yet reached) than for patients with monosomy 7 (14 months).

Patients with monosomy 7 who were treated with Dacogen or Vidaza had a longer median survival time (24 months) than those who received any other treatment (10 months).

Additionally, acute myeloid leukemia-free survival was also longer in monosomy 7 patients who received Dacogen or Vidaza (23 months) than in those who received any other treatment (14 months).  However, this difference was not considered statistically significant.

For more information, please see abstract 1139 at the EHA 2012 meeting website.

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